Thursday, January 18, 2007

Purple Mountain Majesties

Oh. My. God.

Drop whatever you're doing and go straight over to Erik's new blog for some absolutely breathtaking photography:

http://colorado-pictures.blogspot.com/

Thanks, Erik, for sharing these pictures with us. On the downside, my little patch of North Carolina seems to suck more than ever now. And here I was thinking that wasn't even possible.

Dude, if you don't find a market for these, well, someone's just not paying attention.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

It would appear Erik lives in God's country. With such scenery I would throw out my television and just stare out the window.
God Bless You,
Margaret

Erik said...

You're gonna make me blush! I have actually been quite impressed with your photography Morgan. Your continual posting of well done photos (kids and such) and even your gruesome spider pictures are well done, even if the subjects ARE kinda creepy.

Plus I think you have a better camera than mine. Actually I am sure of it. But I like my camera overall. Just needs a telephoto lens I think. The wide angle lens would be really nice out here too with all the mountains. As is I just crop the top and bottom to make it look panoramic.

I would like to get more animal shots. I just dont really know where to go to get them. There is the zoo, but I've never even been there. And then there is a big cat refuge a short drive east of here for lions and tigers and whatnot. Dont ask why it is here. Personally I think Colorado is a retarded place for a "rescue mission" for African cats. That might make for some good photos tho. Especially with a telephoto lens like you did at the zoo.

Suspect said...

Hmmm.

I wish I could photo like that.
Well.

:(

Suspect said...

Hmmm.

I wish I could photo like that.
Well.

:(

Morgan said...

Thanks, Erik. ;-)

It's kind of funny about the camera thing. When I "outgrew" my 1.4 megapixel Sony which I had used to take some really, really good photos I consulted one of our professional photographers at the newspaper.
At the time I was trying to decide between the Canon XT, with 8.1 megapixels and the just-released Canon XTi, with 10 megapixels.
He took me to the hallway that led to the photo department and pointed to these huge enlargements of the beach, sunsets, etc taken by staff photographers. "Those," he said, "were all taken with our digitals, and our digitals are about 4 megapixels."
I was surprised, but he said what others have told me - that it's not the camera, it's the photographer's eye that makes the picture. Sure, a good quality lens, the ability to adjust lighting and focus - all the perks of a professional camera - make a difference, but what it really comes down to is the ability to see what will make a good picture.
More megapixels just mean you can blow your pictures up to poster size withouth losing resolution, and who is going to go bigger than an 11 x 13 anyway?

I love the lighting of your pictures. They are so pretty they make my heart flutter a bit. There's software out there that would enable you to "stitch" scenes together for those amazing panoramic views; my Canon XT comes with software that does just that.

A good telephoto lens would also be great for photos of animals. The big cat refuge would be a great place to shoot. The zoom lens I used at the zoo was a very moderately priced Canon lens and I was pleased with the results, although I'm looking forward to the day when I can afford one that has a stabilizer built in. Really, zoom lenses take better pictures if you use them with a tripod.

OK, at this point I am rambling. But if you decide to upgrade I'd totally recommend the Canon XT. They've dropped $100 or more in price since the XTi came out, but really I think you'd be pleased with the XT, especially for the type of pictures you're interested in taking.

Erik said...

You know, you are right about the photographer being the important piece of the puzzle. However, a crappy camera is like throwing a nascar driver in a toyota corolla and axpecting him to be able to drive at those super high speeds.

Since none of us have all the money we would like to have, I would (and did) choose a good comprimise, in my case the Kodak Z760. One of the reasons I chose it was the professional lens. And I have seen a huge improvement over the crappy HP I had before.

That telephoto lens is definitely on my wish list, along with the wide angle lens. Kodak has them reasonably priced so I may be able to get them before too long.

Only problem is I cant quite tell the specs on them. I am guessing that the telephoto lens is a fixed X? It looks like it says 3.0 or 3.6X which would give me up to 9X zoom.

Erik said...

Oh, one other thing. Far more important than the lens. FAR FAR FAR more important for anyone who is thinking of buying a camera.

A camera MUST take a photo when you press the button. If it doesnt do that then it will simply frustrate you to death and be worthless to you. My HP had a delay between when I pressed the button and when it took the pic, so I could take decent stills/scenery but I couldnt take a picture of a human or animal to save my life.

Morgan said...

"A camera MUST take a photo when you press the button. If it doesnt do that then it will simply frustrate you to death and be worthless to you."

That's one of the things I love about my Canon XT - its continuous shooting capabilities. I've gotten fantastic action shots with this camera of the dogs, the kids, etc. My favorites are the ones I've taken of Lucas jumping in mud puddles with the water splashing up around him. A delay will just drive you plain crazy, as you say, and you'll miss a lot of shots.

I'm not familiar with the Kodak Z760, but your photos are great.

You know, Erik, this Web site might help you better choose a telephoto lens:

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-lenses.htm

It helped me, and while I still want a more powerful telephoto lens the information here helped me understand the lens I did choose.

Erik said...

Morgan

Thanks for the link. Unfortunately I am stuck with the one option I think. My camera is a fancy-schmancy model that can just attach a million different components to it. I may well be stuck with the kodak lens, but I will check it out just in case.

Morgan said...

It'll be good for future reference. The professional-grade digitals get more affordable all the time, and you can never have too much research under your belt. Until I was in a place where I could afford mine (thanks to a major freelance job) I spent my time comparison shopping.