Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Chow mein, anyone?

16 comments:

sammyray said...

SCARY :)

CJ said...

So if it wasn't chicken.....?

Morgan said...

CJ, I'm thinking it was real chow. ;-)

Anonymous said...

ROFL!!

jcw said...

MOTL said, "CJ, I'm thinking it was real chow. ;-)"

Gives new meaning to the phrase "chow time"

Bobbb - Citizen of Earth said...

as long as it tastes good
it's all good

Morgan said...

Not if it's someone's lost cat or dog. ;-)

Suspect said...

I missed Octavia's death post.

She was a good spider.

Sniff.

Visit my blog, for it too has died.

JohnR said...

No, Morgan it was cat.

I heard a guy, who is married to a Chinese woman, giving a talk.

He has tried dog and he says it is not what you think.

The dog the Chinese eat resembles a pig, not a specialized breed.

They don't eat chihuahua or cocker spaniels.

They should, but they don't.

JohnR

Did the storms miss you?!?!

Morgan said...

JohnR, the storms did miss us but not by much. Reiglewood isn't too far away. Our area is prepared for hurricanes but not for tornadoes. We had an F1 about 20 miles away a couple of years ago that killed several people. The damage it did to the poor community it hit was terrible. This one was much worse.
We had high wind and odd-looking skies all morning and our weather radio kept going off every few minutes. I kept at the sky for signs of circulation. We were lucky. All we got was wind and rain.

As for the chinese food, Larry had a former fiance who lived in Taiwan for years. She swears that dogs - particularly black dogs are regularly cooked for food. And there was a recent expose that showed caged dogs being sold for food at an Asian open-air market. From what I've read, there's little that the Asians won't consume.

JohnR said...

They're like the French that way.

JohnR

Lord Omar said...

Man, that is one thing we really miss from our year living in Connecticut -- "kick ass Chinese food". We also miss the 9 y/o and her 7 y/o sister who used to seat us, take our orders, bring the food and ring us up at the cash. Too funny.

Morgan said...

Omar, our local Chinse restaurant is run by an immigrant family with the best work ethic I've ever seen. Their kids have been involved in the business since they were about six and seven and now that they're in college still work there on their spring and summer breaks. And they are the smartest, most polite kids I've ever met.

Lord Omar said...

Morgan -- we were always unsure what to make of the child labour at the restaurant. On the one hand it is absolutely part of their culture to be so involved in the family business at such a young age, but as social workers it was somewhat disconcerting and we wondered about safety concerns that certainly arise in a busy kitchen. Having said that, the kids did not appear to be in any despair whatsoever, so who were we to judge?

CJ said...

There's a difference between a kid working in a family business and a kid working in a sweat shop. Accidents can happen in home kitchens as easily as they can in a restaurant. I think kids gain a lot from learning to work at a young age as long as they are still given time for school and play.

Morgan said...

I tend to agree, both with Lord Omar about the cultural difference and also with CJ about what constitutes child labor.
Our friends at the Chinese restaurant have a very strong family and the kids were very involved with school, including extracurricular activities. They took art and violin and graduated at the tops of their classes. But by the time they were 13 or 14 they could run that whole restaurant in a pinch if their parents weren't there.
The busy kitchen is a concern where little kids are involved, but what I saw them doing when they were young were things like bussing tables, rolling silverware or seating patrons. I don't think I saw them in or around the kitchen until they were ten or eleven. That may seem too young in the eyes of some, but I don't think it's inappropriate for a kid who's mature for their age.